Wednesday, October 01, 2014

Beyond Bagels And Sushi: Meet Francesca Yukari Biller


Aloha, Hip Hapa Homeez. If you love bagels and sushi, we have a treat for you! This month’s Hip Hapa Homee is an award-winning journalist who loves to serve up delicious fusion meals representing both of her cultures—Jewish and Japanese. But she’s about more than just diverse food combos, as you will see below. Dear Hip Hapa Homeez, meet Francesca Yukari Biller:

Francesca serving up cultural fusion
Francesca with parents and siblings
Q: Francesca, who are your parents and how did they meet?

A: My parents are quite honestly two of the most interesting people that I know (and it's not just because they are artists and polar opposites in so many ways), making their intercultural marriage creatively flourish for more than 57 years with four children and six grandchildren.

My father, Les Biller, was born and raised in Los Angeles and his ethnic background is Russian-Jewish, English, Welsh and Irish. He is a full-time artist and was an art professor at USC, UCLA and the University of Hawai’i. My mother, Sumiko Aoki, is 2nd generation Japanese (Nisei) and was born in Captain Cook, Hawaii. Her family owned and farmed Kona coffee lands, and her brothers served as decorated soldiers in the 442nd Infantry during World War II. Today, she is a fashion designer and owns an upscale clothing boutique in Santa Monica, California.

My father has always been a rebel, and I say this quite fondly. After graduating high school, he attended The University of Hawai’i. This was quite a shock, and a wild and an unconventional thing to do, as this was the 1950's not long after World War II when there was still a lot of anti-Japanese sentiment throughout the U.S. This is where he met my mother as she was attending the University of Hawai’i while studying for a Masters degree in teaching. They married shortly after, had two children and spent three years in Kyoto, Japan where my father was a Fulbright Scholar.

"famous L.A. martini", anyone?
Q: You've written about the meals you ate as a child. How did your mother learn to cook Jewish dishes, and did your father share any culinary duties with her?

A: Some of my very first memories as a child includes both images and sounds of my mother cooking as she sang classic jazz standards in our seaside home. No matter what else was happening, our family could always count on my mother's loving brand of homestyle cooking, fashionable and stylish well before international fusion meals became the norm.

I believe that my mother learned to cook classic Jewish dishes like “Sweet and Sour Cabbage Stew”, “Beef Brisket” and “Matzah Ball Soup” not only because my father loved them, but because she truly enjoyed experimenting and trying new recipes; and, the more unique and new, the better.

Some of the recipes were handed down from my Jewish grandparents, and others, like the classic brunch of lox, bagels and cream cheese were borrowed from the numerous Jewish delis that we visited throughout Los Angeles during the 1970's, including the infamous Cantor's Deli where we often saw Jewish comedians like Mel Brooks and Milton Berle.

As for my father, he did not share in any of the preparing or cooking of our meals, although his great priceless contribution included a biting sense of both slapstick and intellectual humor, story telling, and deep conversations about art and culture, along with his "famous L.A. martinis" which attracted unique and colorful guests from many different backgrounds.

Francesca in her "writer's hat"
Q: When did you know you would become a writer?

A: Writing is such a fluid and organic art form, that I candidly cannot recall whether I was first a writer, a person, or a person who was a writer. As I grew up amongst a family of artists going back several generations, my every breath was sewn in music, colorful images and creative cultural thoughts and energy as a natural remedy and rhythm that formed the lives of my siblings and me.

My very first memory as a writer was when I started to write poetry at about four or five-years old. I was in love with the way that words simply looked when letters came together as they both started and ended on a page. Before I attended kindergarten, I was stringing words together that both rhymed and echoed themes of nature and home. First, I wrote short lists of birds, and then of trees and the sun. By the time I was seven, I was writing longer poems about my visits to the seashore with both of my grandfathers, one a Japanese fisherman and the other, a Russian wandering adventurer.

those encouraging parents
Q: With your mother being a fashion designer and your father a painter, in what ways did they encourage you towards a writing career--either consciously or unconsciously?

A: Growing up in my house was like living inside of a symphony that never seemed to have an intermission. Fluid creativity seasoned every sense of both courage and somber attempts, and my parents outwardly and inwardly encouraged passion beyond all other values.

Whether I was watching my mother hand-sew hundreds of intimate silk rosebuds onto a kimono-influenced wedding gown, or my father thrash about his paintbrushes in turpentine and fleshy oils of bright and dark colors, I only knew that I felt alive.

And I felt most alive when I was singing, drawing and writing, which I did religiously each day, even though our home boasted of no religious deities or icons. Rather, the creative process was in and of itself our flames of joy and faith, as my father painted on both small and massive canvases in our living room, and my mother always seemed to have a needle and thread dancing on ribbons of velvets and linen dresses that she designed beneath the large picture window that framed our living room.

Sumiko with flowers in her hair
As a writer, the visual images that my parents continually created before my eyes gave me boundless material to write about--and to become lost in--as I spent whole weekends in which I wrote with barely sleeping or eating, as I developed calluses on my fingers from the art pencils that I grasped with both a sense of longing and calmness. 

Q: It seems you've experienced more than the "usual" mixed-race experience through having a Japanese American mother who grew up in Hawai’i with relatives who were part of the 442nd all-Nisei military as well as being Jewish. How has all of that factored in your life?

A: I believe that having an exotic and unusual mixed-race and cultural background is what has given me the drive to create even more than the average artist, as I feel so much emotional history from the blending and fusion of both. Whether I am inspired by riveting tales of my Japanese samurai and World War II hero relatives, or by stories of bravery, isolation and philosophy from my Jewish ancestors, I know that having the opportunity to be part of both gives me a sense of tenacity and purpose I may not otherwise have.

meet Francesca's daughters
Q:  Do you think by marrying a Jewish man your children may lose some of their Japanese side? What do you do to keep them connected to that part of their identity?

A: I am now divorced from the father of my daughters. However, their thirst and interest for their Japanese identity remains strong, perhaps even stronger than some children who are 100 percent Japanese as they are continually excited about being born into two distinct cultures and, therefore, more curious. As a writer, I have found this to be a usual occurrence among children who are a quarter of some strong thread of race and culture. Our home and extended family inspires our daily life with Japanese culture, whether it be through recipes, painting and writing, watching classic films by director Akira Kurosawa such as “Rashoman” or “Seven Samurai”, or attending cultural events and museums.

Rose and Jade
Q: Tell us about any of your future speaking engagements, panel presentations, etc. 

A: I am an award winning investigative journalist, author, writer, poet, speaker and singer. My work is published for The Japanese American National Museum, Elephant Journal, Salon, The Chicago Sun Times, The Huffington Post, My Jewish Learning.com, Interfaith family.com, USA on Race, for radio and television and events.  

This month, I will be reporting special coverage and writing a unique personal perspective for the exhibit "Hello! Exploring the Super Cute World of Hello Kitty", the first large scale Hello Kitty museum retrospective in the United States in honor of the 40th anniversary of Hello Kitty to open October 11 at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles.

far beyond bagels and sushi
I am also writing two books to be published in 2015. The first book is a collection of humorous and thoughtful essays and short stories about my more than colorful experiences growing up as a Japanese Jewish girl in Los Angeles and Hawai’i during the 1970's.

The second book will be a compilation of poetry and prose that tell stories of a multicultural family and their artistic adventures, as well as motherhood as told through the lens of creativity, idealism and cultural inspiration. Here’s the link to the Author Page: 


Speaking engagements include a special talk for The American Association for University Women in San Francisco in March 2015 about “Girls and Empowerment”, as well as writings and conversation for the Mixed Remixed Festival in June 2015 to be held at the Japanese American National Museum.

Francesca, your story was delicious! Oiishi desu. Mahalo for sharing with us. Hey, Hip Hapa Homeez, if you’re still not full, here’s a short list of some of Francesca’s many accomplishments:

Award Winning Investigative Journalist

Edward R. Murrow Recipient

Writer, Author, Poet, Speaker
Print, Broadcast, Radio, Television
Multiculturalism & Identity
Parenting & Relationships
Inspirational & Philosophy
The Arts & Pop Culture
Short Stories & Essays
Poetry & Prose
Reporting & Documentaries

You can also check out her website:


To learn more about us at Watermelon Sushi World, please check out these links:

Watermelon Sushi film

Watermelon Sushi on Facebook

Hapa*Teez on YouTube

Hapa*Teez on Facebook

Hapa*Teez on Café Press

War Brides of Japan v.2 on YouTube

War Brides of Japan on YouTube

War Brides of Japan on Facebook

Yayoi Lena Winfrey fan page on Facebook (sorry, but Your Hip Hapa can’t add any more friends to her regular profile page)

Sexy Voices of Hollywood

Twitter

Until we meet again on December 3, here’s to all the bagels and sushi your Hip Hapa Homee’s heart desires.

Your Hip Hapa,

Yayoi

Wednesday, August 06, 2014

Teez*ing You, Our Fans And Followers


Aloha Hip Hapa Homeez!

What an awesome realization to know this blog has been around since 2006 (8 years!). Since then, we’ve been expounding on what it means to be biracial, blended, crossing cultures, interracially involved, mestizo, mixed-race, multi-ethnic, transracially adopted and more.



In the beginning, our idea was to create a space where we could meet for discussions. But, we also wanted to make the world aware of our independent film that we began making in 1998--Watermelon Sushi.

Soon, we introduced our Hapa*Teez line of t-shirts to support our project. Our hope was that all you mixies and mixie lovers would purchase one and, with the proceeds, we would finance and finish our film. After all, we only needed to sell 100,000 t-shirts!

Instead, Watermelon Sushi World ended up taking off on many new adventures. From covering the Hapa Japan Conference with guest Japanese African American enka singer, Jero-san, in Berkeley; to launching HapaWood, our own mixed-race version of Hollywood (see Sexy Voices of Hollywood on YouTube); to participating on Mixed Chicks Chat and at their Mixed Roots Film and Literary Festival (now known as Mixed Roots Remixed) in Los Angeles; to celebrating the launch of Canada’s Hapa-palooza Festival; to interviewing filmmakers of interracial movies like Harimaya Bridge and Half-Kenneth; to reviewing author Teri LaFlesh’s highly anticipated book, Curly Like Me; to exposing the efforts of Mixed Marrow and its drives to match mixed-race bone marrow, we have been involved in so many events taking place in our Watermelon Sushi World.







And, now, we’re full circling our original goal.


If you have ever made a Hapa*Teez purchase, please send us a hi-res image, or two, or three, of you wearing it. We’re creating another Hapa*Teez slideshow video and we’d like to feature YOU!




























Come and join us. The more the world knows about our Watermelon Sushi World, the better off we’ll all be.





Please take some time to check out these links, too.

Watermelon Sushi film

Watermelon Sushi on Facebook

Hapa*Teez on YouTube

Hapa*Teez on Facebook

Hapa*Teez on Café Press

War Brides of Japan v.2 on YouTube

War Brides of Japan on YouTube

War Brides of Japan on Facebook

Yayoi Lena Winfrey fan page on Facebook (sorry, but Your Hip Hapa can’t add any more friends to her regular profile page)

Sexy Voices of Hollywood

Twitter

Please watch for our return on October 8. If you or someone you know would like to be interviewed here, drop an email to yourhiphapa@me.com

Your Hip Hapa,

Yayoi


Wednesday, June 04, 2014

Meet Glenn Robinson: Settler. Unarmed. Founder of Many Blogs.


Aloha, Hip Hapa Homeez!

Since the creation of Watermelon Sushi World, its core intent to address mixed-race issues has moved far beyond its original objective. HAPA-ly, Your Hip Hapa would like to report that today’s blog is more about crossing cultures globally than anything else.

Glenn, his son and daughter
If you’re involved with any multi-ethnic groups on social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, this issue’s featured Hip Hapa Homee is a man you’ll recognize. If not, meet Glenn Robinson, a borderless man who refers to himself thusly:




















“Settler. Unarmed. 

I love freedom of movement and campaign for (im)migrant rights. Drop the i-word  
I consult about blogging and social media with Clarity”.

Q: Glenn, who are your parents?

A: My mom is mostly of Irish heritage, but also German. My dad is half German from his mom, and half English and Dutch from his dad. 

Glenn and his kids
Q: How did you grow up, and how did your childhood shape your race consciousness?

A: I grew up on the peninsula side of the San Francisco Bay Area in a working class neighborhood located exactly between the million-dollar homes of a white community and the lowest-rent apartments of a Latino community.

Daily, I traveled through both communities on my bicycle while going to school and work. I was always interested in different cultures, probably due to growing up in a very mixed Bay Area, and without ethnic studies taught to me in grade school or high school. 

Q: You have founded four separate blogs and forums. One is specifically about multicultural folks, another about Amerindians, another is designed to bring communities together, and the last one tackles serious political and human rights issues. That's a lot of writing and updating! What inspires you to be so dedicated to these causes?

A: I started blogging to learn the technology. Half, because I find technology interesting and half, because people kept talking about blogs and I figured that sounded like a great way to reach a mass audience.
  
What inspires me are my children, my wife, our families and society in general. I also get frustrated with all the double standards in the U.S. On the one hand, we learn as youth about the poem at the Statue of Liberty, about the pilgrims invading Native land, then Woody Guthrie's song 'This land is your land'. Who is he singing to in that song? Native Americans, migrant workers, visa holders, immigrants, settlers? When I was little, I truly thought that anyone who set foot in the U.S. could become a citizen. What a rude awakening I have had as an adult. I cannot sit idly while I see xenophobia and hatred from the U.S. every time the news is on.
    
Glenn's daughter
Q: Mixed American Life is chock full of news and opinions about diverse people--from being mixed to being transracially adopted, or interracially involved. What has surprised you the most since its inception?

A: Two things surprised me. First, on a personal note, the fact that I would have a family feud surprised me. I was tired of dealing with subtle racism so I started a dialog about immigration and border walls, and found out I had a family member who was full-on xenophobic.

Second, what I hadn't understood is just how much rape or 'mixed by force', rather than mixed by choice, has occurred in the U.S. during the times of enslavement. I've also learned that Native women are raped by white men on reservations, and some of the laws have made prosecution difficult. 

Glenn's son
Q: Your 500 Nations site is, according to you, "everything Amerindian". Can you talk a little about the reasons that you created it?

A: I started the 500 Nations blog after seeing the documentary movie 500 Nations.  I thought there would be a website that went along with the movie--to learn more--and I couldn't find it, so I made it myself. I call my 500 Nations blog the keystone of my four blogs because it's the centerpiece that all the stories wrap around. 500 Nations allows me to curate the stories and opinions of Amerindians, about what they think about sovereign rights to their land, and what they think about immigration policies. I also thought it strange to be living on someone else's land and not know much about them. I figured since the public school system did not teach me about Amerindians, I will need to teach myself. 

Glenn's wife, Charo, at center holding son with daughter at her side
Q: Community Village Hub is a great spot to check out all of the work you've been doing. You're quite the Wordpress (and Blogger) expert. Do you find these blogs an effective method for getting important messages out to those who otherwise may be unaware?

A: I do feel like I'm making a difference, however small. I know I'm learning for sure, and I have meet great people like you, Yayoi; and, Steven Riley, Tiffany Rae Reid, Heidi Durrow and Fanshen Cox, to name a few. For me to reach a broader audience, I've been learning about social media marketing, and search engine optimization. 

Q: At Oppression Monitor, you get serious about serious issues. Are you hopeful that change will result from people being informed? Or do you think they just read your articles, and move on? Have you been able to monitor any results?

A: I do hope that people will become outraged and that will prompt them to take action for positive change. What I've noticed, however, is that people can only take so much depressing content, then they will tune it out--probably to maintain their sanity. When I hear of leaps forward in positive change, I document it in an online spreadsheet at sites.google.com/site/getgln (you have to scroll down about half way and look for the word 'progress' or 'solution' or 'fixed'):




Free Tech support, Free Music, Free software

Preview by Yahoo



Settler. Unarmed. Founder...
Q: Immigration seems to be the central theme of your blogs. Whether the diasporas result in multiethnic or multicultural people, or the oppression of others, it is definitely something to consider. Will there be more blogs in your future?

A: I thought I had enough to handle when I had three, then I made four. I have learned that I can maintain them better with a little help from people on Elance. I suspect I will mostly work on improving the blogs I have now.  

Mahalo nui loa, Glenn. See you soon in a borderless cyberspace!




Dear Hip Hapa Homeez, thank you for your continuing support. Please join our Hip Hapa Homeez group page on Facebook so you can take part in discussions about being interracially involved, multiracially mixed, transracially adopted and/or crossing cultures in a borderless world. And, please check out any or all of the following links:

Watermelon Sushi film

Watermelon Sushi on Facebook

Hapa*Teez on YouTube

Hapa*Teez on Facebook

Hapa*Teez on Café Press

War Brides of Japan v.2 on YouTube

War Brides of Japan on YouTube

War Brides of Japan on Facebook

Yayoi Lena Winfrey fan page on Facebook (sorry, but Your Hip Hapa can’t add any more friends to her regular profile page)

Sexy Voices of Hollywood

Twitter

Your Hip Hapa will return on August 6 with another interview with a Hip Hapa Homee. Drop us an email at yourhiphapa@me.com to nominate yourself or someone you know.

Your Hip Hapa,

Yayoi